Ruby

Ruby is the most valuable variety of the corundum mineral species, which also includes sapphire.

For thousands of years, the royal and the wealthy have coveted ruby. Its mesmerizing hue inspires passion, love, courage, and devotion while guarding the owner’s wealth and rank. Large rubies are extraordinarily rare, and command prices that rival and surpass the finest large diamonds. It is July's birthstone and has the prestige of celebrating the 15th and 40th wedding anniversaries.

Care

Rubies are rated “excellent” for everyday wear. Avoid exposure to heat and contact with chemicals. To clean, gently scrub with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, or clean in an at-home ultrasonic unit.

Major Sources

Myanmar, Thailand, Mozambique, Madagascar, Tanzania

Lore

Blood-red. Fire-red. Color that burns along the veins, and gives brightness to the night. If you’re looking for the color of life itself, look no further than red. And the gemstone that brings red to vivid life can have only one name: Ruby.

The “king of gems,” Ruby is one of the world’s oldest and most revered gemstones. It is also one of the rarest. The mineral Chromium is responsible for the gem’s startling color. Rubies with hardly any inclusions are so rare that large stones of good color fetch higher prices at auction than even diamonds.

Fiery and romantic, showing brilliant depth and intensity, the red hue of Ruby is certain to draw attention. In settings that focus attention on voluptuous color, Ruby sends a message of drop-dead glamour and femininity. Geometric-inspired jewelry designs featuring Ruby are equally appealing to both men and women who seek to convey strength, honor and classic style.

Ruby is the gem most often bestowed on those born in July. Its arresting hue speaks of passion and love, making it a stunning gem option for the celebration of the 15th and 40th wedding anniversary.